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Author: Anderson, Daniel R.; Bryant, Jennings; Wilder, Alice; Santomero, Angela; Williams, Marsha; Crawley, Alisha M.
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Year: 2000
Article Title: Researching Blue's Clues: Viewing behavior and impact
Journal: Media Psychology
Volume: 2
Edition:
Issue: 2
Pages: 179-194
ISBN/ISSN: 1521-3269
Source of Funding: Nickelodeon; Institute for Communication Research of the University of Alabama
Study Design: Review
Publication Type: Journal Article
Age Group: Childhood (birth-12 yrs), Preschool Age (2-5 yrs)
URL:
Abstract: Objective: To summarize formative research on Blue's Clues exploring whether children acquire a characteristic style of watching TV from the program.

Data Sources: Four research studies exploring the impact of Blue's Clues on developing a style of television viewing or on cognitive/social development.

Study Selection: Studies using a sample of preschool children ages 3 - 5 from AL, CA, NC, RI, and TN. Children who did not receive Nickelodeon at home or daycare were demographically matched to regular viewers of Blue's Clues.

Data Synthesis: Children watching the same episode of Blue's Clues repeatedly show increased material comprehension, especially in using problem-solving strategies. Regular viewers of Blue's Clues tend to interact with TV programming (both Blue's Clues and other programs) more frequently than other children. A longitudinal study indicated that watching Blue's Clues increased information-acquisition skills such as sequencing, patterning, relational concepts, and transformations. The program also improved children's problem solving and flexible thinking such as solving riddles, exhibiting creative thinking, and non-verbal and verbal expression skills.

Conclusions: The Blue's Clues mission of improving comprehension and cognitive and social skills is being achieved successfully. Episode repetition can maximize comprehension without losing audience interest. Children can learn a style of watching TV from one program and transfer that style to other programs. Center on Media and Child Health
Keywords: Attention
Children's Television
Cognitive Development
Communications
Comprehension
Education
Educational Television
Infants and Toddlers
Learning
Prosocial Behavior
Prosocial Behavior (Media Content)
Television Programs
Uses and Gratifications

 

 

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